Apple Brings Facial Recognition to the Masses

Apple’s new facial recognition technology will bring facial biometrics into the mainstream. The tech giant’s new $1,000 iPhone X will let users scan their face for added security when paying at the grocery store or signing into a bank account. The high-end phone is one of three new iPhone models, and the only version with facial recognition. But the top-tier iPhone X could end up netting one-third of all sales of the new iPhone fleet. That would put the new tech in the hands of 70 million or more users around the world within 12 months, barring severe shipping delays or supply shortages. Continue reading “Apple Brings Facial Recognition to the Masses”

Another Blow to Obamacare by Trump

President Trump’s latest move to stop certain Obamacare subsidies to insurers will add more instability to an already fragile marketplace. The president’s decision to cut off the cost-sharing subsidies is the latest in a series of actions aimed at undermining the law. Payments are expected to stop as of November. Estimates put the loss for insurers at about $1.2 billion this year and $7 billion in 2018. The move comes just as insurers are regaining profitability after years of losses. Continue reading “Another Blow to Obamacare by Trump”

Trump To Poke Holes In Iran Deal, Not Rip It Up

On the campaign trail, candidate Donald Trump frequently vowed to “rip up” the Iran nuclear deal—a near-impossible promise to keep considering that the agreement is roughly the size of a large phonebook, making it physically the biggest multilateral treaty negotiated since World War II.

The hardline rhetoric remains, but Trump is unlikely to keep his word. The president still refers to the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the official name of the document signed by the U.S., Iran, Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia that placed strict limits on Iran’s nuclear program for the next 10-15 years in exchange for sanctions relief, as “an embarrassment to the United States.” Continue reading “Trump To Poke Holes In Iran Deal, Not Rip It Up”

Learn to Communicate Like Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett is most famous for being one of the greatest investors of all time. What is less appreciated about the Oracle of Omaha is that he is also an extremely effective communicator, both as a speaker and as a writer.

In this hour-long webinar, communications consultant and author Morey Stettner breaks down Buffett’s style, analyzing what makes him so effective at getting his point across and convincing his audiences. Kiplinger Alerts members can access this special presentation at no cost by clicking on the link below. Continue reading “Learn to Communicate Like Warren Buffett”

GOPer Roy Moore Is Trouble For Party Establishment

Republican firebrand Roy Moore’s easy victory in this week’s Alabama Senate primary runoff against appointed Sen. Luther Strange sent a chill down the spine of the party establishment. And the takeaway for Capitol Hill Republicans was crystal clear: Deliver on key campaign promises, such as repealing Obamacare, or face swift intra-party ouster—no matter how much money or how many high-profile endorsements you’ve pocketed.

The controversial, former state Supreme Court chief justice’s victory was a rebuke of the GOP-controlled Congress and its inability to advance the party’s agenda since winning control of the White House and Congress. Despite endorsements from President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and receiving hefty campaign donations as a result, Strange could muster no better than a 9-percentage point loss. Continue reading “GOPer Roy Moore Is Trouble For Party Establishment”

North Korea: Trump and Kim’s War of Words

If any diplomatic solutions to the North Korean nuclear crisis remain, President Trump is rapidly burning through them. His escalating war of words with North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un, replete with colorful name-calling and provocative threats, is making actual dialogue impossible and upping chances of armed conflict.

Trump kicked off the latest round of verbal sparring with his speech before the United Nations General Assembly, during which he referred to Kim as “Rocket Man” and threatened to “totally destroy North Korea” if the U.S. is “forced to defend itself or its allies.”

Continue reading “North Korea: Trump and Kim’s War of Words”

GOP Health Care Overhaul Down But not Out

Republicans are fully focused on overhauling the tax code after yet another attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act flopped in the Senate this week. But that doesn’t mean they’ve abandoned hope of dismantling President Obama’s signature domestic program. Far from it.

Senate GOPers say that despite their embarrassing failure to do away with Obamacare, they’re within striking distance of drafting a plan their entire 52-member conference can support—a claim President Trump made repeatedly Wednesday. They vow that as soon as they approve a tax reform package (though that endeavor will take months, or longer, and could also end in failure), they’ll immediately pivot back to health care. Continue reading “GOP Health Care Overhaul Down But not Out”

Driverless Cars Are Getting Smarter

Specialized computer chips are giving cars more brainpower to rapidly crunch data and assess their next move. Chip makers are designing new silicon that can run artificial intelligence software to speed up computing tasks, both in the car and in the cloud.

The first place to look for extra smarts: Data centers that are adding AI chips that will improve driverless software. Tech giants Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft, along with Chinese companies Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent, are racing to scoop up the server chips for their massive data centers around the globe. The chips accelerate data-intensive tasks, such as running voice recognition and analyzing photos, while using less power. Continue reading “Driverless Cars Are Getting Smarter”

Florida tourism will bounce back from Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma punched Florida hard, but she failed to deliver a knockout blow to the state’s top industry – tourism.

The Sunshine State’s most popular tourist destinations, including Orlando-area theme parks and coastal beaches, are fine, as are most hotels and resorts. The mega storm hit during one of Florida’s slowest tourism periods, buying precious time to rebuild ahead of the busy winter season. Continue reading “Florida tourism will bounce back from Hurricane Irma”

Federal, State Response to Opioid Crisis Lacking

America’s opioid epidemic is the country’s worst public health crisis in a generation. A deadly combination of prescription pills and various black-market drugs, including heroin, is killing more than 100 people per day. Public health experts expect that number to rise, potentially claiming an additional 650,000 lives over the next decade.

The bottom line: Things will get worse before they get better. The United States remains awash in opioids, despite nascent efforts to clamp down on the problem. The main culprit is overprescription.
Continue reading “Federal, State Response to Opioid Crisis Lacking”