GOP winning streak continues in Georgia

The most expensive House race in history concluded last night in suburban Atlanta with Republican Karen Handel holding off Democrat Jon Ossoff in a race both parties were desperate to win.

It’s not surprising that Handel won the special election in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District to replace former GOP Rep. Tom Price, who joined President Trump’s cabinet in February to head the Department of Health and Human Services. After all, this affluent district is a traditional Republican stronghold that Price easily won in November by 23 percentage points, and that former House Speaker Newt Gingrich held for 20 years. The district has been a Democratic graveyard since the Carter administration. Continue reading “GOP winning streak continues in Georgia”

5 Bright Spots in Cybersecurity

I’ve been quick to point out that digital security threats are on the rise. Hackers are getting more sophisticated, connected devices are shipping with shoddy defenses and the number of attacks is rising.

But it’s not all doom and gloom. In fact, there are some bright spots in the digital security realm. I got an up-close look at some of the latest and greatest cybersecurity technologies and trends at a security conference held last week in Washington, D.C., by market research firm Gartner.

Here are five positive trends about cybersecurity today that I gleaned from listening to security experts for a day. Continue reading “5 Bright Spots in Cybersecurity”

Baseball Brings Temporary Relief to Partisan Polarization

Bipartisanship finally has triumphed in Washington, at least for a short while.

The Capitol Hill community came together Thursday evening in a genuine showing of Republican and Democratic unity at the annual congressional charity baseball game. The event typically serves as a fun time-out from the usual partisan rancor that engulfs the Capitol. But with Washington still reeling from a gunman’s vicious ambush on the GOP team as it practiced a day earlier, the contest served as a cathartic reminder that life is bigger than politics.  Continue reading “Baseball Brings Temporary Relief to Partisan Polarization”

Are Robotic Suits Coming to Your Workplace?

When someone mentions home improvement giant Lowe’s, you might picture vast aisles of paint, plywood and garden supplies. But soon, thoughts of Lowe’s might conjure up images of Iron Man. The retailer is dabbling in robotics through its high-tech research lab that tests a slew of emerging technologies. Its latest project: Productivity-boosting robotic suits known as exoskeletons.

Lowe’s isn’t the only company expressing interest. Exoskeletons will be tested by more and more companies in the coming years. Workers at BMW, FedEx and Amazon are already using suits, according to Kasthuri Jagadeesan, research director of the TechVision Group at Frost & Sullivan. But more testing is needed for wider adoption. “You have to have serious trials,” says Dan Kara, research director at ABI Research. Kara says trials uncover important issues such as how much the suit chafes, how rugged it is and how hard it is to put on and take off. Continue reading “Are Robotic Suits Coming to Your Workplace?”

America and the Latest Middle East Crisis

Donald Trump’s plan to unite much of the Middle East in a shared fight against terrorism and Iran is already on the rocks, thanks to a rapidly escalating feud among numerous U.S. allies in the region.

Five Arab governments (Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Yemen) recently suspended relations with Qatar over its support for radical Islamists and cordial relationship with Iran.

Continue reading “America and the Latest Middle East Crisis”

Dodd-Frank Repeal DOA in Senate

Lost in the Beltway cacophony of Russia-related probes, health care measures and tax reform is the GOP’s call to kill the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Yet despite these efforts, Democrats’ legislative response to the financial crisis will largely remain in place.

A Republican bill that essentially would repeal and replace 2010’s Dodd-Frank Act easily passed the House today along a near-party line vote. But it won’t survive the Senate in its original—or likely any—form. Continue reading “Dodd-Frank Repeal DOA in Senate”

The Killer App for Super-Fast Broadband? Virtual Reality

Internet providers are betting on data-hungry devices to spur consumer demand for super-fast internet. Executives at companies that provide broadband internet expect virtual and augmented reality, the next big consumer technologies, to keep consumers hooked on pricey home internet plans. That’s because immersive experiences with high-end VR will require ultra-fast, high-capacity networks that far outpace today’s average speeds.

Much-improved virtual and augmented reality goggles will boost broadband companies’ sales pitches. A slew of quality consumer headsets—after today’s models are refined to be cheaper, lighter and more powerful—will be available by 2020. Continue reading “The Killer App for Super-Fast Broadband? Virtual Reality”

Trump Pulls the U.S. Out of Paris Climate Accord

Now that President Trump has withdrawn the U.S. from the international climate agreement that seeks to limit future greenhouse gas emissions, it’s worth asking a few questions. What exactly did President Obama commit the U.S. to in Paris in 2015? How significant are U.S. emissions relative to the rest of the world’s? And what are U.S. emission levels likely to be now that Washington has left the pact? (President Trump has left open the possibility of rejoining the Paris accord later, but under what terms is unclear.)

Of course, whether to participate in the Paris deal is largely a political question of public policy, and one that arouses strong feelings. I won’t wade into the arguments surrounding Trump’s decision. But energy consumption is really the issue. And that’s a topic where some objective, apolitical analysis is possible. Continue reading “Trump Pulls the U.S. Out of Paris Climate Accord”

Trump Budget Poses Big Challenge to Republicans

“Dead on arrival”: The three words from Capitol Hill that greet almost every presidential budget. Even when dealing with a president of their own party, lawmakers are loath to relinquish the purse strings. They have the final say on all federal spending and financial priorities.

President Trump’s first full budget, unveiled this week, was received the same. Democrats tore into the document, as expected. But even key Republicans in both chambers welcomed the president’s input like a hiring manager accepts unsolicited resumes.

Continue reading “Trump Budget Poses Big Challenge to Republicans”

Big Picture Trends for the Energy Industry and How Investors Can Profit

I recently teamed up with my colleague Jeff Kosnett to discuss developments in the energy sector, and how they translate into opportunities for investors. Below is a summary of our discussion. At the end of this article is a link to a recording of the conversation, which is free to Kiplinger Alerts subscribers.

Where are oil prices headed?

Markets have been volatile over the last few decades, which is a scary prospect for investors. Continue reading “Big Picture Trends for the Energy Industry and How Investors Can Profit”