What Will Obama, Trump Do About Russia?

President Obama will almost certainly deliver a forceful response to Russia’s cyber-meddling in the 2016 presidential election before his term expires next month and Donald Trump moves into the Oval Office.

What that response will look like is hard to say, though sanctions are much more likely than harsher measures. Cyberdefense remains a weak spot for the U.S., and questions about the best way to respond to acts of online aggression have largely gone unanswered during Obama’s time in office, according to Claude Barfield of the American Enterprise Institute. Continue reading “What Will Obama, Trump Do About Russia?”

Previewing Donald Trump’s Energy and Environmental Policies

It’s safe to say that under President Donald Trump’s administration, a lot is going to change for energy and environmental policies after eight years of President Barack Obama. Trump’s early choices for Cabinet heads – an oil company executive at the State Department, a pro-drilling former Texas governor for the Department of Energy, an outspoken critic of Obama-era climate regulations to head the Environmental Protection Agency – strongly hint at a shift toward more development of natural resources and less-restrictive environmental rules. But what exactly will be changing, especially at the beginning of the Trump administration?

Walking Back Obama Priorities

Admittedly, I don’t have a direct line to Trump Tower, so I can’t ask the Donald himself what sorts of new policies we should expect when he takes office next month. But I have been speaking with folks who know his advisers, or represent influential business groups, or understand the industries most likely to be affected. Here are the highlights of their comments. Continue reading “Previewing Donald Trump’s Energy and Environmental Policies”

Cyberattacks Threaten the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things is giving cybercriminals millions of new vulnerable targets. Internet-enabled devices are plagued by shoddy security and lax regulation. Everything from baby monitors to the electric grid is susceptible to attack as millions more things get connected to the web—20 billion by 2020, up from 6 billion today, according to market research firm Gartner.

The number of connections will continue to soar as it gets cheaper and easier to slap a wireless chip and microprocessor on virtually any product. The ever-growing list of objects that have Wi-Fi includes drones, dolls, teakettles, televisions, lights, locks, refrigerators, thermostats, speakers, virtual reality goggles and bathroom scales. Continue reading “Cyberattacks Threaten the Internet of Things”

Steel Prices on a Sharp Upswing

Prices for steel will rise through early 2017 on the expectation of more infrastructure spending by the Trump administration and robust construction of hotels, office and school buildings. Over the longer run, though, production overcapacity in China will help temper increases.

The cost of steel plate products, used in bridge construction, pipelines, etc., are already up sharply—a 20% increase since the presidential election. Buyers are also shelling out 7% more for steel-reinforcing bar used in road and bridge and building construction. Also up: Prices for hot- and cold-rolled steel, used to make cars, appliances and more. Hot-rolled steel is up 14%; cold-rolled 11%. Meanwhile, scrap metal is selling for 16% more. Continue reading “Steel Prices on a Sharp Upswing”

Will antiestablishment fever sweep through Europe?

Europe is in for a bumpy ride next year, and U.S. business interests across the pond will feel the vibrations.

Populism is sweeping across the continent, generated by voter anger at the political establishment over weak economic growth, the scarcity of jobs, an anti-immigrant backlash and a perception that financial markets matter more to government leaders than the well-being of ordinary workers. It has just swept Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi from power and earlier did the same to British Prime Minister David Cameron—and it’s headed full bore for the European Union’s biggest and most influential economies. Continue reading “Will antiestablishment fever sweep through Europe?”

Trump Administration Will Dial Back Workplace Gains

The pro-labor regulatory agenda of the Labor Department will grind to a halt under President-elect Trump. Executive orders issued during the Obama Administration will be undone and enforcement actions against employers are likely to fall off dramatically.

At the top of the list of rules the Trump Administration will revisit is one on overtime. The rule was set to go into effect on Dec. 1, but a federal judge in Texas temporarily halted implementation. The matter is not expected to be resolved before the new administration takes office, which means that the rule can be pulled back and revised, or shelved. Odds are it will be modified, rather than scrapped, with the salary threshold in the new rule set at about $35,000, from $47,476 in the Obama rule. Continue reading “Trump Administration Will Dial Back Workplace Gains”

Will Trump Bring Better Days for Coal?

One of Donald Trump’s clearest campaign promises was to revive the beleaguered U.S. coal industry and bring back the thousands of mining jobs that have been lost in recent years. Trump pinned the blame for coal’s woes on the Obama administration’s pending climate change regulations, which would discourage burning coal to generate electricity. Trump isn’t in office yet, and his environmental policies are still taking shape. But the coal industry is already enjoying a bit of a comeback.

Natural Gas: Fueling a Coal Comeback

“Coal hit bottom in the spring of this year,” says Andrew Moore, managing editor of Platts Coal Trader at S&P Global Platts. Back then, coal consumption had plummeted and coal’s share of U.S. electricity generation had fallen to its lowest point on record. (It was around that time that we first spoke with Moore, who predicted that 2016 could mark the low point for the coal business.) Continue reading “Will Trump Bring Better Days for Coal?”