What Now for Borrowers and Savers After the Fed Move?

Now that the Fed has raised the effective federal funds rate a quarter of a percentage point to 0.9%, and indicated its intention to raise twice more this year, the effects will ripple out to most borrowing rates, but only to some savings rates.

Borrowing Rates

The bank prime rate, which is the short-term borrowing rate available to the most credit-worthy customers, has already fully adjusted. The prime rate usually rises within one day of a Fed hike. Ditto for home equity lines of credit, which are tied to the prime rate.

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