Federal, State Response to Opioid Crisis Lacking

America’s opioid epidemic is the country’s worst public health crisis in a generation. A deadly combination of prescription pills and various black-market drugs, including heroin, is killing more than 100 people per day. Public health experts expect that number to rise, potentially claiming an additional 650,000 lives over the next decade.

The bottom line: Things will get worse before they get better. The United States remains awash in opioids, despite nascent efforts to clamp down on the problem. The main culprit is overprescription.
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Hurricane-Proofing a City: How Houston Should Prepare for the Next Big Storm

Houston is still reeling from Hurricane Harvey, a record-breaking tropical storm that has drenched the Texas coast with an estimated 21 trillion gallons of water since Aug. 25 and inflicted untold damage on both lives and property.

As with previous hurricanes, many people are asking: What could have been done differently this time to mitigate the damage? And what can be done to prepare for the next storm?

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Afghanistan: Donald Trump Continues America’s Longest War

President Trump’s plan to send thousands more U.S. troops to Afghanistan and emphasize “killing terrorists” over “nation building” put to rest any notion that he intends to wind down America’s longest war.

Trump was short on detail during his first prime-time speech since addressing Congress in February. He didn’t say how many soldiers will join the 8,400-strong U.S. force already in Afghanistan, leaving that specific for the Pentagon to sort out. Nor did he elaborate on the most provocative component of his new strategy: Putting more pressure on Pakistan to stop harboring the Taliban.  

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Conflict Still Unlikely in North Korea Nuclear Standoff

Don’t panic yet: The U.S. is not on the brink of war with North Korea, even after a heated exchange between the two countries that culminated with Pyongyang threatening to put Guam, a strategically important U.S. territory that hosts several American military bases, in the crosshairs.

Heated exchanges are routine in U.S.-North Korean relations. Pyongyang regularly threatens to turn Seoul, the capital of South Korea, into a “sea of fire.” This time, the stakes are higher — as are the tensions between Washington and Pyongyang — but the old rule of thumb still holds: Kim Jong-un knows that any needless military provocation could result in the destruction of his regime, which means he’s unlikely to take such a drastic step.

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North Korea Puts New York in Range

North Korea made another major leap forward in its nuclear program over the weekend, successfully launching a new missile that experts say puts most major U.S. cities, from Los Angeles to New York, in range.

Like most of the Hermit Kingdom’s recent breakthroughs, this one came sooner than expected. North Korea still has several additional steps to master before it officially has the ability to conduct a nuclear attack on the U.S. But American intelligence officials now think North Korea will be able to field a nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile as soon as next year. Just a few months ago, the consensus estimate was somewhere between five and ten years. 

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Congress Rebukes White House on Russia Sanctions

Congress will send a strong message to Donald Trump Tuesday, when the House of Representatives is expected to approve a new package of Russia sanctions: Try easing penalties on Moscow, and you’ll have to answer to us. 

The bill, part of a broader deal that also includes new sanctions on Iran and North Korea, nearly came up short. After breezing through the Senate on a 98-2 vote, it encountered a swarm of opposition in the House.

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From Russia With Love: New Revelations Once Again Put White House on the Defensive

Russia has historically been the downfall of many promising political careers.  Napoleon was on a roll until he decided to invade the country in 1812, when a brutal Russian winter froze his formidable army in its tracks. In America after World War II, the Red Scare ensnared many prominent figures who had once had Soviet sympathies, most notably Alger Hiss, a well-respected diplomat who was tried as a Russian spy (and eventually convicted of perjury).

Donald Trump may be next. No matter how hard the president tries, he can’t seem to shake allegations that members of his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign.  

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The Odd Couple: Trump and Putin Finally Meet

The long-awaited first meeting between President Trump and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin is finally happening Friday at the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany.

It couldn’t come at a stranger time in U.S.-Russian relations. Trump, who came into office seeking a reset with America’s implacable geopolitical adversary, is under pressure at home thanks to an investigation into alleged ties between the Kremlin and his 2016 presidential campaign. Continue reading “The Odd Couple: Trump and Putin Finally Meet”

Nightmare on the Korean Peninsula: Pyongyang Gets an ICBM

Tuesday was the Fourth of July. And while many Americans celebrated the holiday in usual pyrotechnic fashion, it was North Korea that produced the day’s biggest fireworks.

Indeed, Pyongyang chose America’s Independence Day to launch its first successful intercontinental ballistic missile, a major development that came sooner than expected and put the world’s most infamous rogue state one step closer to targeting the U.S. with a nuclear weapon.  Continue reading “Nightmare on the Korean Peninsula: Pyongyang Gets an ICBM”

Supreme Court Gives Trump’s Travel Ban a Boost

President Trump’s travel ban is once again the law of the land—at least for now. The Supreme Court decided Monday to reinstate certain parts of the president’s controversial executive order, pending a full review by the justices this fall.

In a unanimous opinion, the high court struck down two lower court orders that put a hold on the travel restrictions, freeing the Trump administration to impose a freeze on new visas from six Muslim-majority countries (Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) for 90 days.            

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