States Blaze Trail for Marijuana Reform

Few industries operate in a stranger legal and political environment than marijuana. While 33 states and Washington, D.C. have legalized pot for recreational and/or medical use, the federal government still considers it an illicit, controlled substance. In short, pot is simultaneously legal and illegal in these states, depending on the governmental perspective.

The situation has partially handcuffed a nascent industry that otherwise is thriving and shows even greater potential. Legal cannabis sales in the U.S. are expected to top $13 billion this year – $3 billion more than 2018. Look for sales to spike to almost $26 billion in 2025. Continue reading “States Blaze Trail for Marijuana Reform”

Cannabis Industry Has Big but Uncertain Potential

The future is bright for legal marijuana, one of the fastest growing industries in North America. Look for the trade to build on a groundbreaking 2018 with rampant growth in the coming years.

Thirty-three states and Washington, D.C. have legalized pot for medical purposes. And in December, Michigan became the 10th state to also allow recreational use by adults. More states will follow suit this year and beyond. Continue reading “Cannabis Industry Has Big but Uncertain Potential”

To Build or Not to Build the Wall

Since before he was elected to the White House, President Trump has promised Americans he will build a “big beautiful wall” along the U.S.-Mexico border, a barrier he says is needed to secure the United States from dangerous intruders entering the country illegally. But the money for the project has been elusive. Democrats on Capitol Hill have done everything in their power to block his demands, and Trump himself has changed his mind on the price and construction of the wall multiple times.

Now, after almost two years of tense back and forth, the president and Congress have secured a deal that would keep the government fully open through September and provide for 55 miles of physical barriers to be built along the southern border.

But the wall saga is far from over. The president has declared a national emergency on the southern border, which he says will allow the government to redirect funds from other projects to add many more miles of border barriers. Legal challenges are all but certain to follow. If all this leaves you feeling a bit confused, some history on how we reached this point may help. Continue reading “To Build or Not to Build the Wall”

Three New Football Leagues Compete for Survival

The NFL season may screech to a halt after Sunday, but football fans won’t have to wait months to get their next gridiron fix. A new professional football league kicks off next weekend, featuring a 12-game schedule with teams in eight medium-to-large markets across the U.S.

The Alliance of American Football, founded by TV and film producer Charlie Ebersol and longtime NFL executive Bill Polian, features teams in two cities already home to NFL clubs: Atlanta and Phoenix. CBS will broadcast the league’s inaugural games on Saturday, Feb. 9, after which the CBS Sports Network will carry one AAF game a week throughout the season. The championship game is slated for the weekend of April 26-28. Continue reading “Three New Football Leagues Compete for Survival”

Shutdown Will Haunt Federal Workforce for Years

While the federal government has fully reopened, at least through mid-February, its recent partial shutdown is poised to inflict significant long-term harm to its workforce.

The shutdown has tarnished one of the main attractions of working for the federal government: Job stability. Unlike the private sector, the federal government can’t go out of business and doesn’t typically lay people off. But with the threat of future shutdowns always a possibility in the current political climate, that perk is now greatly diminished. Continue reading “Shutdown Will Haunt Federal Workforce for Years”

McConnell Big Midterm Winner

There is no savvier, effective politician in Washington than Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The Kentucky Republican masterfully orchestrated a midterm campaign strategy for the Senate that not only stymied a nationwide Democratic surge, but led to his party gaining at  least one seat in the chamber, all while his party lost control of the House by a healthy margin.

The Senate map favored the GOP all along. Democrats defended a whopping 26 seats, compared with only nine held by Republicans. And eight of those GOP seats were in states President Trump won in 2016, while 10 of the Democratic ones were in Trump territory. Continue reading “McConnell Big Midterm Winner”

Congress Readies for ‘Lame Duck’ Session

Lawmakers will return their attention to governing, starting next week. Congress reconvenes on Tuesday to wrap up unfinished business before the new Congress is seated in January. Despite losing control of the House in Tuesday’s midterm elections, Republicans still run the show on both sides of Capitol Hill. They intend to take full advantage of their fleeting power during the lame-duck session that could run through the holidays.

Keeping the federal government open is the most pressing issue. Numerous agencies’ funding runs out Dec. 7. If lawmakers and President Trump can’t agree on how much money to appropriate each, the departments of Homeland Security, State, Justice, Interior, Agriculture and others would have to halt most operations come Dec. 8. Continue reading “Congress Readies for ‘Lame Duck’ Session”

All the President’s Congressmen

As a political outsider, candidate Donald Trump had little support on Capitol Hill during the nascent days of his presidential run. As he cranked into high gear in mid-2016, a small cadre of supporters emerged, mostly from the House. They became Trump loyalists and the relationship was mutually beneficial; the lawmakers got coveted access to the White House while Trump gained a critical foothold in Congress.

But like everything else in Trumpland’s constant state of flux, the list of Trump insiders looks very different now than it did two years ago. The only constant is that all members are Republicans. Expect the list to keep evolving as his White House tenure matures. Continue reading “All the President’s Congressmen”

Defense Industry Happy With Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Pick

Look for the powerful Senate Armed Services Committee to be more deferential to the Pentagon, the White House and the defense industry in the wake of Chairman John McCain’s (R-AZ) death.

Sen. James Inhofe of Oklahoma, now the panel’s top Republican, is poised to take over the gavel as soon as this week. The committee plays a leading role in overseeing U.S. defense policy, including helping craft defense policy bills that do everything from specifying how many tanks the Army can buy to limiting U.S.-Russian military cooperation. Inhofe’s approach will contrast starkly with that of the “maverick” McCain. Continue reading “Defense Industry Happy With Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Pick”

Jordan Plays House GOP Kingmaker

Rep. Jim Jordan likely won’t be the next House Republican leader, though that isn’t stopping him from vying to replace Wisconsin’s Paul Ryan as the lower chamber’s top GOPer next year. But the Ohio firebrand is positioned to play kingmaker, shifting House Republicans’ balance of power closer to the conservative edges in the process.

Winning the leadership contest isn’t Jordan’s only motive for running, and possibly not his principal one. He wants to solidify the influence of the House Republican Conference’s conservative flank, particularly that of the Freedom Caucus, the politically far-right group he cofounded in 2015. Continue reading “Jordan Plays House GOP Kingmaker”