Shopping for a New Car? Here’s What to Know Now

If you’re going to be in the market for a new car this year, it pays to know what sort of shape the auto industry is in and what sort of deals you can expect to find. If you haven’t shopped for new wheels in a while, you might be surprised at just how much the market has changed.

U.S. auto sales are still going strong, but they’re showing signs of weakening, according to industry analysts. Every expert I spoke with recently expects total sales to come in a bit below 17 million this year, which would be good, but behind the recent pace. Combined sales of cars and light trucks hit a record 17.5 million in 2016 and stayed above the 17-million market in 2017 and 2018; 16.8 million or a bit lower seems like a reasonable bet for this year. Continue reading “Shopping for a New Car? Here’s What to Know Now”

CAFE Rollback Uncorks Another Regulatory Fight

The Trump administration’s push to roll back vehicle fuel-economy standards sets the stage for a lengthy legal battle with Democrats, environmental groups and the state of California, who hail the Obama administration rules as a landmark achievement in the fight against climate change.

Once finalized, the joint proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency and Transportation Department would suspend required increases in corporate average fuel-economy standards (CAFE) after 2020, capping them at a fleet average of 37 miles per gallon. President Obama’s plan, by contrast, called for raising the standard to 47 miles per gallon by 2025.

Continue reading “CAFE Rollback Uncorks Another Regulatory Fight”

What Car Shoppers Need To Know This Year

If you’re in the market for a new ride or might be later in 2018: You’ll find better deals on popular SUVs and crossovers…new or used…if you wait a bit. Manufacturers continue to ramp up SUV and crossover production, so that supply of these popular vehicles may soon outstrip demand. Also, while vehicle sales are off to a good start so far this year, they’re likely to slow later, forcing automakers to rely more on discounting and other buyer incentives. These should approach $5,000 per vehicle, on average.

Given the popularity of SUVs and crossovers, manufacturers are offering more models than ever before, including luxury models. Car-based crossover SUVs are especially prized for their blend of size and practicality. Plus they’re relatively fuel-efficient, so the return of $3 gas won’t ding their popularity. As a result, manufacturers are cutting back on their car models. The Chevy Impala is likely to be cut, and Ford has already announced that it will abandon most of its car models in the next few years to focus on SUV/crossover/pickup truck production. (The Ford F-150 pickup truck is the best-selling model of any vehicle.) Even sedan perennial best sellers Toyota Camry, Honda Accord and Nissan Altima have required incentives to bolster demand. This means that there are likely to be some good deals on car models as the shift occurs, especially full-size and mid-size sedans. Demand for compact cars has ticked up recently as the cost-conscious buyer segment finds fewer low-cost options. Continue reading “What Car Shoppers Need To Know This Year”