All the President’s Congressmen

As a political outsider, candidate Donald Trump had little support on Capitol Hill during the nascent days of his presidential run. As he cranked into high gear in mid-2016, a small cadre of supporters emerged, mostly from the House. They became Trump loyalists and the relationship was mutually beneficial; the lawmakers got coveted access to the White House while Trump gained a critical foothold in Congress.

But like everything else in Trumpland’s constant state of flux, the list of Trump insiders looks very different now than it did two years ago. The only constant is that all members are Republicans. Expect the list to keep evolving as his White House tenure matures. Continue reading “All the President’s Congressmen”

Defense Industry Happy With Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Pick

Look for the powerful Senate Armed Services Committee to be more deferential to the Pentagon, the White House and the defense industry in the wake of Chairman John McCain’s (R-AZ) death.

Sen. James Inhofe of Oklahoma, now the panel’s top Republican, is poised to take over the gavel as soon as this week. The committee plays a leading role in overseeing U.S. defense policy, including helping craft defense policy bills that do everything from specifying how many tanks the Army can buy to limiting U.S.-Russian military cooperation. Inhofe’s approach will contrast starkly with that of the “maverick” McCain. Continue reading “Defense Industry Happy With Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Pick”

McCain’s Legacy: Fierce Independence

The death of Arizona Sen. John McCain after a year-long battle with brain cancer leaves Congress, the Republican Party and U.S. foreign policy without a crucial leader.

There’s little that hasn’t been said about the “last lion” of the Senate, who spent 35 years in Congress and made two unsuccessful bids for the presidency, winning the Republican nomination in 2008 before losing to then-fellow Sen. Barack Obama in the general election.

Continue reading “McCain’s Legacy: Fierce Independence”

CAFE Rollback Uncorks Another Regulatory Fight

The Trump administration’s push to roll back vehicle fuel-economy standards sets the stage for a lengthy legal battle with Democrats, environmental groups and the state of California, who hail the Obama administration rules as a landmark achievement in the fight against climate change.

Once finalized, the joint proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency and Transportation Department would suspend required increases in corporate average fuel-economy standards (CAFE) after 2020, capping them at a fleet average of 37 miles per gallon. President Obama’s plan, by contrast, called for raising the standard to 47 miles per gallon by 2025.

Continue reading “CAFE Rollback Uncorks Another Regulatory Fight”

Jordan Plays House GOP Kingmaker

Rep. Jim Jordan likely won’t be the next House Republican leader, though that isn’t stopping him from vying to replace Wisconsin’s Paul Ryan as the lower chamber’s top GOPer next year. But the Ohio firebrand is positioned to play kingmaker, shifting House Republicans’ balance of power closer to the conservative edges in the process.

Winning the leadership contest isn’t Jordan’s only motive for running, and possibly not his principal one. He wants to solidify the influence of the House Republican Conference’s conservative flank, particularly that of the Freedom Caucus, the politically far-right group he cofounded in 2015. Continue reading “Jordan Plays House GOP Kingmaker”

Three Things to Watch in the Midterms

Amid all the talk of a Democratic boom in the midterm elections, bear three things in mind that likely will determine whether Republicans maintain control of the House of Representatives: The structural advantages Republicans built into the system over the last few decades; key Republican-held suburban districts; and how much money, hard and soft, each side has.

There is plenty of good news for Democrats, and voter enthusiasm is on their side. However, they have a higher hurdle to clear to win control of the House than they did in 2006, or than Republicans did when they won it back in 2010, because partisan gerrymandering has erased so many swing districts. Continue reading “Three Things to Watch in the Midterms”

Democrats Make Anti-Kavanaugh Case for Naught

Unless Democrats unearth some truly disqualifying information about Judge Brett Kavanaugh, expect the U.S. Court of Appeals jurist to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court.

Two days after President Trump tapped the 53-year-old alum of President George W. Bush’s administration, Senate Democrats and liberal groups are struggling to explain exactly why the Washington, D.C. native should be denied the seat. Continue reading “Democrats Make Anti-Kavanaugh Case for Naught”

Control of Congress on the Line as Fall Midterms Loom

Control of Congress is once again on the line as Democrats and Republicans gear up for the November midterm elections. With voting less than five months away, where do the two parties stand?

The race for the House is too close to call at this point. Democrats will certainly gain seats; the “out” party usually does during non-presidential elections. They need a net gain of at least 23 for a majority. Continue reading “Control of Congress on the Line as Fall Midterms Loom”

“It’s the Economy, Stupid”: Trump and GOP Hope to Ride Economy to Victory in November

The strong economy is a political boon to President Trump and Republicans as they fight to maintain control of Congress. The numbers speak for themselves.

Growth is hovering around 3%. Unemployment (3.8%) is the lowest in nearly two decades, with a record number of job openings (6.7 million) to boot. Consumer spending is brisk after starting the year sluggish. Continue reading ““It’s the Economy, Stupid”: Trump and GOP Hope to Ride Economy to Victory in November”

2018 is the New “Year of the Woman” in Politics

A new “Year of the Woman” is taking shape in politics. An unprecedented number of women are running for Congress and governor this year, reflecting a sharp uptick of overall female participation in politics since the 2016 presidential election, particular within the Democratic Party.

Women still face some challenges, so it’s uncertain how this crop will fare come Election Day. But women have never been better positioned to make gains at the state and national levels. Continue reading “2018 is the New “Year of the Woman” in Politics”